IR-2014-119, Dec. 29, 2014

WASHINGTON -- Following the passage of the extenders legislation, the Internal Revenue Service announced today it anticipates opening the 2015 filing season as scheduled in January.

The IRS will begin accepting tax returns electronically on Jan. 20. Paper tax returns will begin processing at the same time.

The decision follows Congress renewing a number of "extender" provisions of the tax law that expired at the end of 2013. These provisions were renewed by Congress through the end of 2014. The final legislation was signed into law Dec 19, 2014.

"We have reviewed the late tax law changes and determined there was nothing preventing us from continuing our updating and testing of our systems," said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. "Our employees will continue an aggressive schedule of testing and preparation of our systems during the next month to complete the final stages needed for the 2015 tax season."

The IRS reminds taxpayers that filing electronically is the most accurate way to file a tax return and the fastest way to get a refund. There is no advantage to people filing tax returns on paper in early January instead of waiting for e-file to begin.

More information about IRS Free File and other information about the 2015 filing season will be available in January.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Turning Interest Payments Into Tax Deductions

    Make interest payments work for you, not against you

    You can deduct business-related interest on your business return if you used the borrowed funds to purchase business supplies, equipment, services, etc. Co-mingling business and personal expenses makes it difficult to determine what amount of the interest is business versus personal. If this happens, the IRS may consider the entire amount as nondeductible personal interest and disallow the deduction. Therefore, keep all business purchases made with loans and credit cards clearly separate from your personal expenses. Use a separate credit card for your business to make it easier.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Self Employed Health Insurance

    If you are a self-employed taxpayer, you may deduct 100 percent of your health insurance premiums from your income. The deduction for health insurance premiums does not reduce your self-employment tax, however.
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Are You Putting Investments in Your Child's Name?

    New rules tighten your options
     
     For the 2014 tax year, children, under the age of 18 who have unearned income in excess of $2,000,are taxed at their parent'shigher rate. At age 18. the kiddie tax applies unless the child provides more than 50% of his/her own support. The kiddie tax also applies to full-time studnets between the ages of 19 and 23 unless they provide more than 50% of their own support. Generally, unearned income includes interest and dividend income, capital gains, taxable social security benefits, and pension distributions.

Personal Quick Tip

  • Medical and Charitable Mileage

    Do you use your auto for charitable purposes? What about going to and from the doctor or dentist? Your mileage for both medical and charitable purposes may be deductible on your tax return. It is important to set up a mileage log and keep it handy so you can track your deductible mileage throuhghout the year.