We don't want to rush you
but your taxes are due in:


Each year, many people get a larger refund than they expect. Some find they owe a lot more tax than they thought they would. If this has happened to you, review your situation to prevent a tax surprise. Did you marry? Have a child? Change in income? Life events can have a major impact on your taxes. Bring the taxes you pay closer to the amount you owe. Here are some tips to help you come up with a plan:

  • New Job. When you start a new job, you must fill out a Form W-4, Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate, and give it to your employer. Your employer will use the form to figure the amount of federal income tax to withhold from your pay. Use the IRS Withholding Calculator on IRS.gov to help you fill out the form. This tool is easy to use and it’s available 24/7.

  • Estimated Tax. If you earn income that is not subject to withholding you may need to pay estimated tax. This may include income such as self-employment, interest, dividends or rent. If you expect to owe $1,000 or more in tax, and meet other conditions, you may need to pay this tax. You normally pay it four times a year. Use the worksheet in Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals, to figure the tax.

  • Life Events. Check to see if you need to change your Form W-4 or change the amount of estimated tax you pay when certain life events take place. A change in your marital status, the birth of a child or the purchase of a new home can change the amount of taxes you owe. In most cases, you can submit a new Form W–4 to your employer anytime. 

  • Changes in Circumstances. If you are receiving advance payments of the premium tax credit, it is important that you report changes in circumstances, such as changes in your income or family size, to your Health Insurance Marketplace. You should also notify the Marketplace when you move out of the area covered by your current Marketplace plan. Advance payments of the premium tax credit help you pay for the insurance you buy through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Reporting changes will help you get the proper type and amount of financial assistance so you can avoid getting too much or too little in advance.

For more see Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax. You can get it on IRS.gov/forms at any time.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Deducting the Business Use of Your Home

    Don't overlook your home office

    If you use a portion of your home for business, you may be able to take a home office deduction whether you are self-employed or an employee. Expenses that you may be able to deduct for business use of the home may include the business portion of real estate taxes, mortgage interest, rent, utilities, insurance, depreciation, painting, and repairs.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Mileage Rate 2

    The optional standard mileage rate for the business use of an automobile is 54 cents per mile in 2016.
Friday, 23rd March 2018

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Tax Tips Personal

  • Naming a Beneficiary to Your Retirement Plan

    Nonspouse beneficiaries have new options

    If you are the beneficiary of a decedent's qualified retirement plan, and you are not the spouse of the decedent, you now have additional options for distributions. In the past, only a spouse beneficiary was permitted to roll the account into an IRA. Now, beginning in 2007,

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Personal Quick Tip

  • IRA Contribution Deadline

    If by year-end you haven't contributed funds to your 2016 IRA, or if you've put in less than the maximum allowed, don't worry. You can contribute to either a traditional or Roth IRA until the April due date for filing your tax return for 2016 not including extensions. You can contribute up to $5,500 to your IRA each year. If you are age 50 or older, you are allowed to contribute an additional $1,000.