Everyone should know how the IRS contacts taxpayers. This will help people avoid becoming a victim of scammers who pretend to be from the IRS with a goal of stealing personal information.
Here are some facts about how the IRS communicates with taxpayers:

  • The IRS doesn't normally initiate contact with taxpayers by email.

  • The agency does not send text messages or contact people through social media.

  • When the IRS needs to contact a taxpayer, the first contact is normally by letter delivered by the U.S. Postal Service.  Fraudsters will send fake documents through the mail, and in some cases will claim they already notified a taxpayer by U.S. mail.

  • Depending on the situation, IRS employees may first call or visit with a taxpayer. In some instances, the IRS sends a letter or written notice to a taxpayer in advance, but not always.

  • IRS revenue agents or tax compliance officers may call a taxpayer or tax professional after mailing a notice to confirm an appointment or to discuss items for a scheduled audit.

  • Private debt collectors can call taxpayers for the collection of certain outstanding inactive tax liabilities, but only after the taxpayer and their representative have received written notice.

  • IRS revenue officers and agents routinely make unannounced visits to a taxpayer’s home or place of business to discuss taxes owed, delinquent tax returns or a business falling behind on payroll tax deposits. IRS revenue officers will request payment of taxes owed by the taxpayer. However, taxpayers should remember that payment will never be requested to a source other than the U.S. Treasury.

  • When visited by someone from the IRS, the taxpayers should always ask for credentials. IRS representatives can always provide two forms of official credentials: a pocket commission and a Personal Identity Verification Credential.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Determining Qualified Business Expenses

    Be sure to deduct every legitimate expense

    Amounts you spend in the course of conducting business are generally deductible from the gross income of that business. This includes any start-up expenses. You can claim amounts spent for items ordinary and necessary in your trade or business as a deduction against your income. Otherwise, the amounts are amortized, depreciated, or expensed depending on the nature of the purchases.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Use of Vehicle

    If your business owns a vehicle that is available for an employee's personal and business use, the vehicle is nevertheless considered used 100 percent for business on the business tax return. The personal-use percentage is included on the employee's W-2 as additional compensation.
Monday, 18th March 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Overlooked Employee Business Expenses

    Don't miss out on deductions you are allowed to take

    Unreimbursed employee business expenses are allowed as a miscellaneous itemized deduction provided they exceed two percent of your adjusted gross income when combined with all your other miscellaneous expenses.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Medical and Charitable Mileage

    Do you use your auto for charitable purposes? What about going to and from the doctor or dentist? Your mileage for both medical and charitable purposes may be deductible on your tax return. It is important to set up a mileage log and keep it handy so you can track your deductible mileage throuhghout the year.