You may not have to include it in income

When you are liable for a loan but can't repay it, some lenders will forgive the debt. What many borrowers don't realize is that this cancellation of debt results in taxable income in the year of forgiveness. The lender usually will issue a 1099-C to report the cancelled debt. If you receive one, don't ignore it. Be sure to give it to your tax preparer and discuss the circumstances surrounding the loan.

If you have cancelled debt but are bankrupt or insolvent, you may exclude the income on your tax return. To prove insolvency, your liabilities must exceed the fair market value of your assets immediately before the debt discharge. The amount of forgiven debt can be excluded cannot be more than the amount your liabilities exceed the value of your assets.

In light of the current mortgage crisis, Congress has provided more relief for borrowers who couldn't pay their mortgages. If you have forgiveness of debt on the mortgage of your qualified principal residence (usually due to foreclosure), you don't have to recognize cancelled debt. The maximum amount of debt forgiveness eligible for exclusion is $2 million. This relief is available for tax years 2007 through 2014.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Employee Meals: When Does the 50-Percent Limit Apply?

    Don't reduce your deduction if you aren't required to

    In most cases, an employer is only allowed to deduct one-half of the expense that is paid to employees for meals. However, in some instances, the full amount is allowed.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Use of Vehicle

    If your business owns a vehicle that is available for an employee's personal and business use, the vehicle is nevertheless considered used 100 percent for business on the business tax return. The personal-use percentage is included on the employee's W-2 as additional compensation.
Monday, 18th March 2019
EASEAL_L

What is an Enrolled Agent and why should I care?

Click Here to find out

 

NATP Member

Follow us on

TwitterFacebook

Tax Tips Personal

  • Did You Move This Year?

    Your moving expenses may be deductible

    If you moved this year because of a change in your job location or because you started a new job, you may be able to deduct the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects to your new home. The expenses of traveling to the new home including lodging expenses, are also deductible. Meals, however, are not.

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Summer Day Camp

     

    Along with the lazy, hazy days of summer come some extra expenses, including summer day camp. But, the IRS has some good news for parents: those added expenses may help you qualify for a tax credit.

    Many parents who work or are looking for work must arrange for care of their children under 13 years of age during the school vacation. The Child and Dependent Care Credit is available for expenses incurred during the summer and throughout the rest of the year.