Summer is often a time when people make major life decisions. Common events include buying a home, getting married or changing jobs. If you're looking for a new job in your same line of work, you may be able to claim a tax deduction for some of your job hunting expenses.

Here are seven things the IRS wants you to know about deducting these costs:

1. Your expenses must be for a job search in your current occupation. You may not deduct expenses related to a search for a job in a new occupation. If your employer or another party reimburses you for an expense, you may not deduct it.

2. You can deduct employment and job placement agency fees you pay while looking for a job.

3. You can deduct the cost of preparing and mailing copies of your résumé to prospective employers.

4. If you travel to look for a new job, you may be able to deduct your travel expenses. However, you can only deduct them if the trip is primarily to look for a new job.

5. You can't deduct job search expenses if there was a substantial break between the end of your last job and the time you began looking for a new one.

6. You can't deduct job search expenses if you're looking for a job for the first time.

7. You usually will claim job search expenses as a miscellaneous itemized deduction. You can deduct only the amount of your total miscellaneous deductions that exceed two percent of your adjusted gross income.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Employers of Tipped Employees Allowed a Tax Credit

    Are you getting the credit you deserve?

    If you are an employer in the food and beverage industry, you may be entitled to a tax credit for the social security and Medicare taxes you pay on your employees' tip income. You must meet both of the following requirements to qualify for the credit:

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • DOT Hours of Service

    Truck drivers and other employees who are subject to the Department of Transportation's "hours of service" rules are allowed to deduct 80 percent of their meals in 2016. In lieu of using actual expenses for meals and incidental expenses, you can deduct the federal rate of $63 per day.
Saturday, 25th May 2019
EASEAL_L

What is an Enrolled Agent and why should I care?

Click Here to find out

 

NATP Member

Follow us on

TwitterFacebook

Tax Tips Personal

  • Tax Break for Reservists Called to Active Duty

    Penalty-free withdrawals from retirement plans

    If you are a reservist or national guardsman who was ordered or called to active duty for a period in excess of 179 days, you may withdraw money from your qualified retirement plan or IRA without incurring the 10% premature distribution penalty.

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Teacher Expenses

    If you are a teacher who spent your own money for classroom supplies, you can take a deduction for up to $250 of those costs.