Six Tips on Gambling Income and Losses

Whether you roll the dice, play cards or bet on the ponies, all your winnings are taxable. The IRS offers these six tax tips for the casual gambler.

1. Gambling income includes winnings from lotteries, raffles, horse races and casinos. It also includes cash and the fair market value of prizes you receive, such as cars and trips.

2. If you win, you may receive a Form W-2G, Certain Gambling Winnings, from the payer. The form reports the amount of your winnings to you and the IRS. The payer issues the form depending on the type of gambling, the amount of winnings, and other factors. You'll also receive a Form W-2G if the payer withholds federal income tax from your winnings.

3. You must report all your gambling winnings as income on your federal income tax return. This is true even if you do not receive a Form W-2G.

4. If you're a casual gambler, report your winnings on the "Other Income" line of your Form 1040, U. S. Individual Income Tax Return.

5. You may deduct your gambling losses on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. The deduction is limited to the amount of your winnings. You must report your winnings as income and claim your allowable losses separately. You cannot reduce your winnings by your losses and report the difference.

6. You must keep accurate records of your gambling activity. This includes items such as receipts, tickets or other documentation. You should also keep a diary or similar record of your activity. Your records should show your winnings separately from your losses.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Reimbursing Your Employees for Business Expenses

    What method should you choose?

    Attracting and keeping good employees is a goal in any business. One way to make life easier for your employees is to have an easy to use reimbursement plan. Travel, transportation, moving, and educational expenses are common reimbursable expenses. As the employer, you have the option to set up an accountable or nonaccountable reimbursement plan. Under either plan, you can deduct many of the business expenses paid to or for employees. However, the plan you choose can make a big difference to your employees.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Self Employed Health Insurance

    If you are a self-employed taxpayer, you may deduct 100 percent of your health insurance premiums from your income. The deduction for health insurance premiums does not reduce your self-employment tax, however.
Friday, 17th August 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Tax Break for Reservists Called to Active Duty

    Penalty-free withdrawals from retirement plans

    If you are a reservist or national guardsman who was ordered or called to active duty for a period in excess of 179 days, you may withdraw money from your qualified retirement plan or IRA without incurring the 10% premature distribution penalty.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Adjusting Withholding

    If your tax refund was too high or too low, adjust your withholding so it doesn't happen again next year. You can file a revised W-4 with your employer at any time to increase or decrease the number of exemptions you claim. The more exemptions you claim, the less tax your employer withholds from your wages, resulting in a smaller refund. Decreasing the number of exemptions results in more withholding and a larger refund.