Six Tips on Gambling Income and Losses

Whether you roll the dice, play cards or bet on the ponies, all your winnings are taxable. The IRS offers these six tax tips for the casual gambler.

1. Gambling income includes winnings from lotteries, raffles, horse races and casinos. It also includes cash and the fair market value of prizes you receive, such as cars and trips.

2. If you win, you may receive a Form W-2G, Certain Gambling Winnings, from the payer. The form reports the amount of your winnings to you and the IRS. The payer issues the form depending on the type of gambling, the amount of winnings, and other factors. You'll also receive a Form W-2G if the payer withholds federal income tax from your winnings.

3. You must report all your gambling winnings as income on your federal income tax return. This is true even if you do not receive a Form W-2G.

4. If you're a casual gambler, report your winnings on the "Other Income" line of your Form 1040, U. S. Individual Income Tax Return.

5. You may deduct your gambling losses on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. The deduction is limited to the amount of your winnings. You must report your winnings as income and claim your allowable losses separately. You cannot reduce your winnings by your losses and report the difference.

6. You must keep accurate records of your gambling activity. This includes items such as receipts, tickets or other documentation. You should also keep a diary or similar record of your activity. Your records should show your winnings separately from your losses.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Thinking of Selling Your Corporation?

    Carefully review your options before making a decision

    When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Use of Vehicle

    If your business owns a vehicle that is available for an employee's personal and business use, the vehicle is nevertheless considered used 100 percent for business on the business tax return. The personal-use percentage is included on the employee's W-2 as additional compensation.
Thursday, 17th January 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth?

    You may want to wait

    At some point, taxpayers who have a traditional IRA may wish to convert it to a Roth. Roth IRAs are more flexible in that there are no required minimum distributions when the owner reaches age 70 1/2. In addition, qualified distributions from a Roth IRA are not taxable.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Combat Pay

    Military personnel may elect to treat combat pay that is excluded from gross income as earned income in determining both eligibility for the earned income tax credit and the amount of that credit.