Nontaxable combat pay is considered compensation

Members of the military serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other combat zone localities can now put money into an IRA, even if they received tax-free combat pay. Under the Heroes Earned Retirement Opportunities (HERO) Act,

military personnel can now count tax-free combat pay when determining whether they qualify to contribute to either a Roth or traditional IRA. Before this change, members of the military whose earnings came entirety from tax-free combat pay were generally barred from using IRAs to save for retirement.
 
For those under the age of 50, the IRA contribution limit was $5,000 for 2012 and is $5,500 for 2013 and 2014. For those age 50 and over, the limit was $6,000 for 2012 and is $6,500 for 2013 and 2014. 

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Reimbursing Your Employees for Business Expenses

    What method should you choose?

    Attracting and keeping good employees is a goal in any business. One way to make life easier for your employees is to have an easy to use reimbursement plan. Travel, transportation, moving, and educational expenses are common reimbursable expenses. As the employer, you have the option to set up an accountable or nonaccountable reimbursement plan. Under either plan, you can deduct many of the business expenses paid to or for employees. However, the plan you choose can make a big difference to your employees.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Assets to a Business

    If you have contributed personal assets, such as a computer or vehicle to your business, the lower of the fair market value or your cost basis of these assets qualifies as a business deduction, subject to depreciation limitations, beginning with the date of conversion.
Tuesday, 16th October 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • IRAs and Charitable Contributions

    New option for charitable giving

    If you are age 70 1/2 or older, there is another option for you to consider when making charitable contributions. Beginning after December 31, 2005, you may be allowed to make a charitable contribution of up to $100,000 of distributions from your IRA. Although there is no charitable contribution deduction allowed,

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Tuition Deduction

    If you paid qualifying tuition and related expenses in 2016, you may be able to deduct up to $4,000 of the costs or qualify for a tax credit.