Nontaxable combat pay is considered compensation

Members of the military serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other combat zone localities can now put money into an IRA, even if they received tax-free combat pay. Under the Heroes Earned Retirement Opportunities (HERO) Act,

military personnel can now count tax-free combat pay when determining whether they qualify to contribute to either a Roth or traditional IRA. Before this change, members of the military whose earnings came entirety from tax-free combat pay were generally barred from using IRAs to save for retirement.
 
For those under the age of 50, the IRA contribution limit was $5,000 for 2012 and is $5,500 for 2013 and 2014. For those age 50 and over, the limit was $6,000 for 2012 and is $6,500 for 2013 and 2014. 

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Determining Qualified Business Expenses

    Be sure to deduct every legitimate expense

    Amounts you spend in the course of conducting business are generally deductible from the gross income of that business. This includes any start-up expenses. You can claim amounts spent for items ordinary and necessary in your trade or business as a deduction against your income. Otherwise, the amounts are amortized, depreciated, or expensed depending on the nature of the purchases.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Assets to a Business

    If you have contributed personal assets, such as a computer or vehicle to your business, the lower of the fair market value or your cost basis of these assets qualifies as a business deduction, subject to depreciation limitations, beginning with the date of conversion.
Friday, 22nd February 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Cleaning Out Your Closets?

    Items you donate may not qualify for a deduction

    It used to be that you could take all your unused clothing and household items to the local Goodwill, Salvation Army, or thrift store and reap a nice charitable contribution deduction.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Adjusting Withholding

    If your tax refund was too high or too low, adjust your withholding so it doesn't happen again next year. You can file a revised W-4 with your employer at any time to increase or decrease the number of exemptions you claim. The more exemptions you claim, the less tax your employer withholds from your wages, resulting in a smaller refund. Decreasing the number of exemptions results in more withholding and a larger refund.