Nontaxable combat pay is considered compensation

Members of the military serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other combat zone localities can now put money into an IRA, even if they received tax-free combat pay. Under the Heroes Earned Retirement Opportunities (HERO) Act,

military personnel can now count tax-free combat pay when determining whether they qualify to contribute to either a Roth or traditional IRA. Before this change, members of the military whose earnings came entirety from tax-free combat pay were generally barred from using IRAs to save for retirement.
 
For those under the age of 50, the IRA contribution limit was $5,000 for 2012 and is $5,500 for 2013 and 2014. For those age 50 and over, the limit was $6,000 for 2012 and is $6,500 for 2013 and 2014. 

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Automobile Expenses

    Which is better - deducting the standard mileage rate or actual expenses?

    With the fluctuating cost of gas, it might be a good idea to revisit which tax deduction is the most beneficial - claiming 54.5 cents per mile (2018) or your actual vehicle expenses. Claiming the standard mileage rate is easier. All you have to do is keep track of your business miles and multiply them by the current rate. In addition to the standard mileage rate, you may also deduct the costs for parking and tolls. Plus, if you are self-employed, you can deduct the interest paid on your car loan.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Mileage Rate

    Instead of deducting the actual expenses for the business use of your vehicle, opt for the standard mileage rate. In 2016, you can deduct 54 cents for each business mile you drive.
Saturday, 15th December 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Overlooked Employee Business Expenses

    Don't miss out on deductions you are allowed to take

    Unreimbursed employee business expenses are allowed as a miscellaneous itemized deduction provided they exceed two percent of your adjusted gross income when combined with all your other miscellaneous expenses.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • IRA for Children

    If your child has earned income from a summer job, you may want to consider opening an IRA for him or her. There is no minimum age for contributing to an IRA. The only requirement is that the person making the contribution has earned income and has not reached age 70 1/2.