We don't want to rush you
but your taxes are due in:


Your moving expenses may be deductible

If you moved this year because of a change in your job location or because you started a new job, you may be able to deduct the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects to your new home. The expenses of traveling to the new home including lodging expenses, are also deductible. Meals, however, are not.

If the move is closely related to the start of work and you meet both the IRS distance and time tests, your moving expenses are deductible. Certain members of the armed forces do not need to meet the tests if the move was due to a permanent change of station.

The move will meet the distance test if your new main job location is at least 50 miles farther from your former home than the old main job location. To determine whether you meet this test, use the shortest distance of the most commonly traveled routes between these points-. -Figure the distance between the former residence and the new job and then subtract the distance between the former residence and the old job. If the result is 50 miles or more, you've met the distance test.

You'll meet the time test if you work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the 12 months immediately following the move. If you are self-employed, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months after the move. The IRS makes exceptions to the time test in cases involving death, disability, or involuntary separation from service.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Starting Your Own Business?

    Here are a few quick tips to help you reduce taxes

    Open a separate business checking account. Many small business owners don't realize the complications that can arise from using their personal checking account to pay for business expenses. If business expenses are mixed in with personal expenses, the IRS may disallow them.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Self Employed Health Insurance

    If you are a self-employed taxpayer, you may deduct 100 percent of your health insurance premiums from your income. The deduction for health insurance premiums does not reduce your self-employment tax, however.
Friday, 23rd March 2018

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Tax Tips Personal

  • Job Search Expenses May Lower Your Taxes

    Summer is often a time when people make major life decisions. Common events include buying a home, getting married or changing jobs. If you're looking for a new job in your same line of work, you may be able to claim a tax deduction for some of your job hunting expenses.

    Here are seven things the IRS wants you to know about deducting these costs:

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Combat Pay

    Military personnel may elect to treat combat pay that is excluded from gross income as earned income in determining both eligibility for the earned income tax credit and the amount of that credit.