Your moving expenses may be deductible

If you moved this year because of a change in your job location or because you started a new job, you may be able to deduct the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects to your new home. The expenses of traveling to the new home including lodging expenses, are also deductible. Meals, however, are not.


If the move is closely related to the start of work and you meet both the IRS distance and time tests, your moving expenses are deductible. Certain members of the armed forces do not need to meet the tests if the move was due to a permanent change of station.

The move will meet the distance test if your new main job location is at least 50 miles farther from your former home than the old main job location. To determine whether you meet this test, use the shortest distance of the most commonly traveled routes between these points-. -Figure the distance between the former residence and the new job and then subtract the distance between the former residence and the old job. If the result is 50 miles or more, you've met the distance test.

You'll meet the time test if you work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the 12 months immediately following the move. If you are self-employed, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months after the move. The IRS makes exceptions to the time test in cases involving death, disability, or involuntary separation from service.

Tax Tips Small Business

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    Here are a few quick tips to help you reduce taxes

    Open a separate business checking account. Many small business owners don't realize the complications that can arise from using their personal checking account to pay for business expenses. If business expenses are mixed in with personal expenses, the IRS may disallow them.

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  • Business Credit Card

    Use your credit card to buy equipment and supplies that you will need in the upcoming year. Charges on your credit card for deductible business expenses are allowed in the year you make the purchase, not in the year the charge is paid. Pay off your credit card after the beginning of the year and avoid finance charges.
Monday, 21st August 2017
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