Your moving expenses may be deductible

If you moved this year because of a change in your job location or because you started a new job, you may be able to deduct the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects to your new home. The expenses of traveling to the new home including lodging expenses, are also deductible. Meals, however, are not.


If the move is closely related to the start of work and you meet both the IRS distance and time tests, your moving expenses are deductible. Certain members of the armed forces do not need to meet the tests if the move was due to a permanent change of station.

The move will meet the distance test if your new main job location is at least 50 miles farther from your former home than the old main job location. To determine whether you meet this test, use the shortest distance of the most commonly traveled routes between these points-. -Figure the distance between the former residence and the new job and then subtract the distance between the former residence and the old job. If the result is 50 miles or more, you've met the distance test.

You'll meet the time test if you work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the 12 months immediately following the move. If you are self-employed, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months after the move. The IRS makes exceptions to the time test in cases involving death, disability, or involuntary separation from service.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Thinking of Selling Your Corporation?

    Carefully review your options before making a decision

    When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Mileage Rate

    Instead of deducting the actual expenses for the business use of your vehicle, opt for the standard mileage rate. In 2016, you can deduct 54 cents for each business mile you drive.
Monday, 17th June 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Money for College

    Are scholarships taxable?

    Many college students receive scholarships or fellowships to help pay for their education. If you are in college and received a scholarship or fellowship grant, there are a few key points to keep in mind. Qualified scholarships and fellowships are treated as tax-free and not included in taxable income if all of the following conditions are met:

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Medical and Charitable Mileage

    Do you use your auto for charitable purposes? What about going to and from the doctor or dentist? Your mileage for both medical and charitable purposes may be deductible on your tax return. It is important to set up a mileage log and keep it handy so you can track your deductible mileage throuhghout the year.