Certain solar-powered improvements are eligible for a tax credit

You are allowed a credit for 30 percent of certain expenditures that increase the energy efficiency of your personal residence. Costs eligible for the credit include qualified solar electric property expenditures, qualified solar water heating property expenditures, and qualified fuel cell property expenditures. The credit is available for residential energy-efficient property placed in service in 2006, 2007, and 2008. There is no requirement that property be new to qualify.
Qualified solar water heating property expenditures are expenditures for property to heat water for use in your residence if at least half of the energy used is derived from the sun. Qualified solar electric property expenditures are expenditures for property that uses solar energy to generate electricity for use in your home. Qualified fuel cell property expenditures are expenditures for qualified fuel cell property installed on or in connection with your home. Costs for labor properly allocated to the onsite preparation, assembly, or original installation of qualifying property and for piping or wiring to interconnect such property to the dwelling unit are also considered qualifying expenditures. Expenditures for swimming pools and hot tubs do not qualify.

The maximum credit allowed for any tax year is $2,000 for any qualified solar electric property expenditures or qualified solar water heating property expenditures, and $500 for each half kilowatt of capacity of qualified fuel cell property for which qualified fuel cell property expenditures are made. If your allowable credit exceeds your tax liability, the excess can be carried over to the next year.

If your home is jointly occupied and used during the year as a residence by two or more individuals, the maximum amount of qualifying expenditures that may be taken into account by all the owners is:
  • $6,667 in the case of any qualified solar electric property expenditures;
  • $6,667 in the case of any qualified solar water heating property expenditures; and
  • $1,667 in the case of each half kilowatt of capacity of qualified fuel cell property.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Do You Know How Much Your Business Is Worth?

    Tips for placing a value on your business

    There are several reasons why you should know the value of your business. if you are planning to sell your business, the general rule is that you should sell it for fair market value. In many instances the term "fair market value" is somewhat ambiguous. In the simplest sense, fair market value is what a willing buyer would pay a willing seller, with each party knowing all the pertinent facts.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Assets to a Business

    If you have contributed personal assets, such as a computer or vehicle to your business, the lower of the fair market value or your cost basis of these assets qualifies as a business deduction, subject to depreciation limitations, beginning with the date of conversion.
Saturday, 25th May 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Did You Move This Year?

    Your moving expenses may be deductible

    If you moved this year because of a change in your job location or because you started a new job, you may be able to deduct the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects to your new home. The expenses of traveling to the new home including lodging expenses, are also deductible. Meals, however, are not.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Mutual Fund Cost Basis

    If you own mutual funds, it is important to keep track of your reinvested dividends. These dividends increase your cost basis resulting in a lower capital gain when you sell the fund.