Make interest payments work for you, not against you

You can deduct business-related interest on your business return if you used the borrowed funds to purchase business supplies, equipment, services, etc. Co-mingling business and personal expenses makes it difficult to determine what amount of the interest is business versus personal. If this happens, the IRS may consider the entire amount as nondeductible personal interest and disallow the deduction. Therefore, keep all business purchases made with loans and credit cards clearly separate from your personal expenses. Use a separate credit card for your business to make it easier.

Also, make sure to tell your tax professional if you use home equity debt for business expenses. He or she will be able to determine how much of the interest you can elect to deduct directly against self-employment income.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Employers of Tipped Employees Allowed a Tax Credit

    Are you getting the credit you deserve?

    If you are an employer in the food and beverage industry, you may be entitled to a tax credit for the social security and Medicare taxes you pay on your employees' tip income. You must meet both of the following requirements to qualify for the credit:

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Self Employed Health Insurance

    If you are a self-employed taxpayer, you may deduct 100 percent of your health insurance premiums from your income. The deduction for health insurance premiums does not reduce your self-employment tax, however.
Tuesday, 16th October 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Direct Deposit of Your Tax Refund

    More options are available to you

    The IRS is now allowing taxpayers who are due a tax refund the option of having that refund split up and deposited in up to three different bank accounts.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • IRA Contribution Deadline

    If by year-end you haven't contributed funds to your 2016 IRA, or if you've put in less than the maximum allowed, don't worry. You can contribute to either a traditional or Roth IRA until the April due date for filing your tax return for 2016 not including extensions. You can contribute up to $5,500 to your IRA each year. If you are age 50 or older, you are allowed to contribute an additional $1,000.