Carefully review your options before making a decision

When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

If the corporation sells its assets, the corporation may close its doors. The assets could be sold to one person who intends to operate a business similar to yours, but does not want your corporation. The corporation return will reflect the sale of the assets. When the corporation liquidates, your share of the cash will be reported on Form 1099-DIV as a liquidating distribution. You'll use Form 1099-DIV to report the sale of your stock on Schedule D. Selling assets of the corporation could result in double taxation. The sale of the assets is taxable to the corporation and the liquidating distribution is taxable to the shareholder.

If you are selling the corporation stock for a loss, you may qualify for special tax treatment. It's a good idea to review the tax consequences of the sale with your tax advisor before making a move.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Electing to Expense the Cost of Your Business Assets

    Section 179 deduction limits increase

    The IRS allows taxpayers the option of either depreciating some assets over a specified number of years or deducting all or a portion of the cost in one year. The expense election, commonly referred to as the Section 179 deduction, is made in the year the asset is placed in service. The benefit is a large deduction in the current year that is not reduced even if the asset is placed in service late in the tax year.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Personal Assets to a Business

    If you have contributed personal assets, such as a computer or vehicle to your business, the lower of the fair market value or your cost basis of these assets qualifies as a business deduction, subject to depreciation limitations, beginning with the date of conversion.
Monday, 21st August 2017
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Naming a Beneficiary to Your Retirement Plan

    Nonspouse beneficiaries have new options

    If you are the beneficiary of a decedent's qualified retirement plan, and you are not the spouse of the decedent, you now have additional options for distributions. In the past, only a spouse beneficiary was permitted to roll the account into an IRA. Now, beginning in 2007,

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Personal Quick Tip

  • HSA Contributions

    Contributions to a health savings account (HSA) must be made by the due date of your tax return excluding extensions.