Carefully review your options before making a decision

When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

If the corporation sells its assets, the corporation may close its doors. The assets could be sold to one person who intends to operate a business similar to yours, but does not want your corporation. The corporation return will reflect the sale of the assets. When the corporation liquidates, your share of the cash will be reported on Form 1099-DIV as a liquidating distribution. You'll use Form 1099-DIV to report the sale of your stock on Schedule D. Selling assets of the corporation could result in double taxation. The sale of the assets is taxable to the corporation and the liquidating distribution is taxable to the shareholder.

If you are selling the corporation stock for a loss, you may qualify for special tax treatment. It's a good idea to review the tax consequences of the sale with your tax advisor before making a move.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Turning Interest Payments Into Tax Deductions

    Make interest payments work for you, not against you

    You can deduct business-related interest on your business return if you used the borrowed funds to purchase business supplies, equipment, services, etc. Co-mingling business and personal expenses makes it difficult to determine what amount of the interest is business versus personal. If this happens, the IRS may consider the entire amount as nondeductible personal interest and disallow the deduction. Therefore, keep all business purchases made with loans and credit cards clearly separate from your personal expenses. Use a separate credit card for your business to make it easier.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • SS Wage Base

    The Social Security wage base increases to $118,500 in 2016. This means that you are no longer required to withhold social security tax for employees after meeting this threshold. However, you are required to withhold Medicare taxes regardless of the amount of wages paid.
Tuesday, 24th October 2017
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Charitable Remainder Trusts

    Reduce your estate by gifting property

    There are many ways to contribute to a charitable organization. You can write a check, donate property, or give of your time. If you're planning for retirement, you might want to consider making a gift of a future interest in your property by establishing a charitable remainder unitrust or annuity trust. These trusts allow you to contribute the property and retain an income stream.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • IRA for Children

    If your child has earned income from a summer job, you may want to consider opening an IRA for him or her. There is no minimum age for contributing to an IRA. The only requirement is that the person making the contribution has earned income and has not reached age 70 1/2.