Carefully review your options before making a decision

When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

If the corporation sells its assets, the corporation may close its doors. The assets could be sold to one person who intends to operate a business similar to yours, but does not want your corporation. The corporation return will reflect the sale of the assets. When the corporation liquidates, your share of the cash will be reported on Form 1099-DIV as a liquidating distribution. You'll use Form 1099-DIV to report the sale of your stock on Schedule D. Selling assets of the corporation could result in double taxation. The sale of the assets is taxable to the corporation and the liquidating distribution is taxable to the shareholder.

If you are selling the corporation stock for a loss, you may qualify for special tax treatment. It's a good idea to review the tax consequences of the sale with your tax advisor before making a move.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Turning Interest Payments Into Tax Deductions

    Make interest payments work for you, not against you

    You can deduct business-related interest on your business return if you used the borrowed funds to purchase business supplies, equipment, services, etc. Co-mingling business and personal expenses makes it difficult to determine what amount of the interest is business versus personal. If this happens, the IRS may consider the entire amount as nondeductible personal interest and disallow the deduction. Therefore, keep all business purchases made with loans and credit cards clearly separate from your personal expenses. Use a separate credit card for your business to make it easier.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Credit Card

    Use your credit card to buy equipment and supplies that you will need in the upcoming year. Charges on your credit card for deductible business expenses are allowed in the year you make the purchase, not in the year the charge is paid. Pay off your credit card after the beginning of the year and avoid finance charges.
Saturday, 15th December 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Divorced?

    Know the rules before claiming a dependent

    If you are a divorced or separated parent, the rules for determining which one of you can claim the children as dependents is confusing at best. A few years ago, the IRS created rules that provided a uniform definition of a child for purposes of claiming certain tax benefits such as the head of household filing status, the child tax credit, the dependent care credit, arid the earned income tax credit.

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • HSA Contributions

    Contributions to a health savings account (HSA) must be made by the due date of your tax return excluding extensions.