Carefully review your options before making a decision

When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

If the corporation sells its assets, the corporation may close its doors. The assets could be sold to one person who intends to operate a business similar to yours, but does not want your corporation. The corporation return will reflect the sale of the assets. When the corporation liquidates, your share of the cash will be reported on Form 1099-DIV as a liquidating distribution. You'll use Form 1099-DIV to report the sale of your stock on Schedule D. Selling assets of the corporation could result in double taxation. The sale of the assets is taxable to the corporation and the liquidating distribution is taxable to the shareholder.

If you are selling the corporation stock for a loss, you may qualify for special tax treatment. It's a good idea to review the tax consequences of the sale with your tax advisor before making a move.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Employee Meals: When Does the 50-Percent Limit Apply?

    Don't reduce your deduction if you aren't required to

    In most cases, an employer is only allowed to deduct one-half of the expense that is paid to employees for meals. However, in some instances, the full amount is allowed.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Credit Card

    Use your credit card to buy equipment and supplies that you will need in the upcoming year. Charges on your credit card for deductible business expenses are allowed in the year you make the purchase, not in the year the charge is paid. Pay off your credit card after the beginning of the year and avoid finance charges.
Thursday, 18th April 2019
EASEAL_L

What is an Enrolled Agent and why should I care?

Click Here to find out

 

NATP Member

Follow us on

TwitterFacebook

Tax Tips Personal

  • IRAs and Charitable Contributions

    New option for charitable giving

    If you are age 70 1/2 or older, there is another option for you to consider when making charitable contributions. Beginning after December 31, 2005, you may be allowed to make a charitable contribution of up to $100,000 of distributions from your IRA. Although there is no charitable contribution deduction allowed,

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Qualified Tuition Plan

    It doesn't appear that a college education will get cheaper any time soon. Look into establishing a qualified tuition plan for your children. The earnings in the account grow tax-free. As long as the funds are spent on qualified education expenses, there are no tax consequences. Plus, there may be an added tax benefit at your state level.