Carefully review your options before making a decision

When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

If the corporation sells its assets, the corporation may close its doors. The assets could be sold to one person who intends to operate a business similar to yours, but does not want your corporation. The corporation return will reflect the sale of the assets. When the corporation liquidates, your share of the cash will be reported on Form 1099-DIV as a liquidating distribution. You'll use Form 1099-DIV to report the sale of your stock on Schedule D. Selling assets of the corporation could result in double taxation. The sale of the assets is taxable to the corporation and the liquidating distribution is taxable to the shareholder.

If you are selling the corporation stock for a loss, you may qualify for special tax treatment. It's a good idea to review the tax consequences of the sale with your tax advisor before making a move.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Do You Know How Much Your Business Is Worth?

    Tips for placing a value on your business

    There are several reasons why you should know the value of your business. if you are planning to sell your business, the general rule is that you should sell it for fair market value. In many instances the term "fair market value" is somewhat ambiguous. In the simplest sense, fair market value is what a willing buyer would pay a willing seller, with each party knowing all the pertinent facts.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • Employer Provided Education

    Employer-provided education assistance benefits of $5,250 provided under a written plan are excludable from wages. The education doesn't need to be job-related to qualify.
Thursday, 18th January 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Giving to Charity

    New rules require diligent recordkeeping
    Keeping the receipts from your charitable contributions just became more of a priority. Starting January 2007, you will not be allowed to deduct charitable contributions of any amount unless you have the proof. What does this mean for you? Starting in 2007,

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Adjusting Withholding

    If your tax refund was too high or too low, adjust your withholding so it doesn't happen again next year. You can file a revised W-4 with your employer at any time to increase or decrease the number of exemptions you claim. The more exemptions you claim, the less tax your employer withholds from your wages, resulting in a smaller refund. Decreasing the number of exemptions results in more withholding and a larger refund.