Here are a few quick tips to help you reduce taxes

Open a separate business checking account. Many small business owners don't realize the complications that can arise from using their personal checking account to pay for business expenses. If business expenses are mixed in with personal expenses, the IRS may disallow them.

When you set up a business checking account at the bank, be prepared to submit either your social security number (SSN) or an employer identification number (EIN). Your SSN will do if you plan on establishing a sole proprietorship and do not have employees or a retirement plan. If you plan on operating a partnership or corporation, you'll need to submit an EIN.

Keep track of expenses you incur before you start your business. Expenses incurred once you decide to start a business, but before business operations actually begin, are deductible up to $5,000 in the first year of business. The rest is deductible over 180-month period after your business opens its doors.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Do You Know How Much Your Business Is Worth?

    Tips for placing a value on your business

    There are several reasons why you should know the value of your business. if you are planning to sell your business, the general rule is that you should sell it for fair market value. In many instances the term "fair market value" is somewhat ambiguous. In the simplest sense, fair market value is what a willing buyer would pay a willing seller, with each party knowing all the pertinent facts.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • SS Wage Base

    The Social Security wage base increases to $118,500 in 2016. This means that you are no longer required to withhold social security tax for employees after meeting this threshold. However, you are required to withhold Medicare taxes regardless of the amount of wages paid.
Tuesday, 21st November 2017
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Is an Inheritance Taxable?

    In most cases, an inheritance is not taxable to you, but there are exceptions

    At some point, you may inherit money or property that, in most cases, is not taxable to you. Life insurance proceeds are included in the deceased person's estate, but are not taxable to the beneficiaries. Bank accounts and other income-producing assets such as stocks are not taxable to you when received, but the income these assets generate is taxable to you.

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Personal Quick Tip

  • Qualified Mortgage Insurance

    In 2016, premiums that are paid or accrued for "qualified mortgage insurance" in connection with home acquisition debt on your residence are deductible as home mortgage interest.