Here are a few quick tips to help you reduce taxes

Open a separate business checking account. Many small business owners don't realize the complications that can arise from using their personal checking account to pay for business expenses. If business expenses are mixed in with personal expenses, the IRS may disallow them.

When you set up a business checking account at the bank, be prepared to submit either your social security number (SSN) or an employer identification number (EIN). Your SSN will do if you plan on establishing a sole proprietorship and do not have employees or a retirement plan. If you plan on operating a partnership or corporation, you'll need to submit an EIN.

Keep track of expenses you incur before you start your business. Expenses incurred once you decide to start a business, but before business operations actually begin, are deductible up to $5,000 in the first year of business. The rest is deductible over 180-month period after your business opens its doors.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Turning Interest Payments Into Tax Deductions

    Make interest payments work for you, not against you

    You can deduct business-related interest on your business return if you used the borrowed funds to purchase business supplies, equipment, services, etc. Co-mingling business and personal expenses makes it difficult to determine what amount of the interest is business versus personal. If this happens, the IRS may consider the entire amount as nondeductible personal interest and disallow the deduction. Therefore, keep all business purchases made with loans and credit cards clearly separate from your personal expenses. Use a separate credit card for your business to make it easier.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Mileage Rate 2

    The optional standard mileage rate for the business use of an automobile is 54 cents per mile in 2016.
Wednesday, 26th September 2018
EASEAL_L

What is an Enrolled Agent and why should I care?

Click Here to find out

 

NATP Member

Follow us on

TwitterFacebook

Tax Tips Personal

  • Tax Break for Reservists Called to Active Duty

    Penalty-free withdrawals from retirement plans

    If you are a reservist or national guardsman who was ordered or called to active duty for a period in excess of 179 days, you may withdraw money from your qualified retirement plan or IRA without incurring the 10% premature distribution penalty.

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Qualified Tuition Plan

    It doesn't appear that a college education will get cheaper any time soon. Look into establishing a qualified tuition plan for your children. The earnings in the account grow tax-free. As long as the funds are spent on qualified education expenses, there are no tax consequences. Plus, there may be an added tax benefit at your state level.