Section 179 deduction limits increase

The IRS allows taxpayers the option of either depreciating some assets over a specified number of years or deducting all or a portion of the cost in one year. The expense election, commonly referred to as the Section 179 deduction, is made in the year the asset is placed in service. The benefit is a large deduction in the current year that is not reduced even if the asset is placed in service late in the tax year.


 The Section 179 deduction is not without other limits, however. For example, the most you are allowed to expense in 2017 is $510,000 with a phase-out level beginning at $2,000,000. Additionally, your Section 179 deduction is limited to your taxable income from all your active trades or businesses, including wage income reported to you or your spouse on Form W-2.

If you elect to use the Section 179 deduction, you may change your mind and revoke the election. Conversely, if you do not make the election in the year the property was placed in service, you may amend your return and claim the deduction.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Employers of Tipped Employees Allowed a Tax Credit

    Are you getting the credit you deserve?

    If you are an employer in the food and beverage industry, you may be entitled to a tax credit for the social security and Medicare taxes you pay on your employees' tip income. You must meet both of the following requirements to qualify for the credit:

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Mileage Rate 2

    The optional standard mileage rate for the business use of an automobile is 54 cents per mile in 2016.
Friday, 22nd February 2019
EASEAL_L

What is an Enrolled Agent and why should I care?

Click Here to find out

 

NATP Member

Follow us on

TwitterFacebook

Tax Tips Personal

  • Converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth?

    You may want to wait

    At some point, taxpayers who have a traditional IRA may wish to convert it to a Roth. Roth IRAs are more flexible in that there are no required minimum distributions when the owner reaches age 70 1/2. In addition, qualified distributions from a Roth IRA are not taxable.

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • IRA for Children

    If your child has earned income from a summer job, you may want to consider opening an IRA for him or her. There is no minimum age for contributing to an IRA. The only requirement is that the person making the contribution has earned income and has not reached age 70 1/2.