Section 179 deduction limits increase

The IRS allows taxpayers the option of either depreciating some assets over a specified number of years or deducting all or a portion of the cost in one year. The expense election, commonly referred to as the Section 179 deduction, is made in the year the asset is placed in service. The benefit is a large deduction in the current year that is not reduced even if the asset is placed in service late in the tax year.


 The Section 179 deduction is not without other limits, however. For example, the most you are allowed to expense in 2017 is $510,000 with a phase-out level beginning at $2,000,000. Additionally, your Section 179 deduction is limited to your taxable income from all your active trades or businesses, including wage income reported to you or your spouse on Form W-2.

If you elect to use the Section 179 deduction, you may change your mind and revoke the election. Conversely, if you do not make the election in the year the property was placed in service, you may amend your return and claim the deduction.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Clothing for Your Job is Not Always Deductible

    Understanding the rules

    Many taxpayers are required to maintain a certain personal appearance or wear special clothing for work. However, not all your purchases for work-related attire or personal grooming reap a tax deduction. If you are required to wear a uniform or other special clothing that has the name of your employer or some other logo on it, that cost is deductible as a miscellaneous itemized deduction.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Like Kind Exchange

    If you are disposing of property used in your business, you may want to consider a like-kind exchange to defer the taxable gain on the sale.
Saturday, 15th December 2018
EASEAL_L

What is an Enrolled Agent and why should I care?

Click Here to find out

 

NATP Member

Follow us on

TwitterFacebook

Tax Tips Personal

  • Money for College

    Are scholarships taxable?

    Many college students receive scholarships or fellowships to help pay for their education. If you are in college and received a scholarship or fellowship grant, there are a few key points to keep in mind. Qualified scholarships and fellowships are treated as tax-free and not included in taxable income if all of the following conditions are met:

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Making Gifts

    Are you planning on making any substantial gifts? Talk to your tax preparer first. Gifts with values exceeding $14,000 must be reported to the IRS.