Understanding the rules

Many taxpayers are required to maintain a certain personal appearance or wear special clothing for work. However, not all your purchases for work-related attire or personal grooming reap a tax deduction. If you are required to wear a uniform or other special clothing that has the name of your employer or some other logo on it, that cost is deductible as a miscellaneous itemized deduction.


Other employees, such as models, flight attendants, or other professionals who are required to maintain a highly professional, well-groomed appearance, may find that the cost of their expensive clothing and cosmetics will not save tax dollars. Even if your employer tells you that you must wear certain clothing, if it is not in the nature of a uniform, the cost is personal.

Remember, the general rule of thumb is that if the clothing is suitable for every-day wear, it's not deductible.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Employee Meals: When Does the 50-Percent Limit Apply?

    Don't reduce your deduction if you aren't required to

    In most cases, an employer is only allowed to deduct one-half of the expense that is paid to employees for meals. However, in some instances, the full amount is allowed.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Self Employed Health Insurance

    If you are a self-employed taxpayer, you may deduct 100 percent of your health insurance premiums from your income. The deduction for health insurance premiums does not reduce your self-employment tax, however.
Saturday, 15th December 2018
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Job Search Expenses May Lower Your Taxes

    Summer is often a time when people make major life decisions. Common events include buying a home, getting married or changing jobs. If you're looking for a new job in your same line of work, you may be able to claim a tax deduction for some of your job hunting expenses.

    Here are seven things the IRS wants you to know about deducting these costs:

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Combat Pay

    Military personnel may elect to treat combat pay that is excluded from gross income as earned income in determining both eligibility for the earned income tax credit and the amount of that credit.