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Updated 2018 Withholding Tables Now Available; Taxpayers Could See Paycheck Changes by February

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today released Notice 1036, which updates the income-tax withholding tables for 2018 reflecting changes made by the tax reform legislation enacted last month. This is the first in a series of steps that IRS will take to help improve the accuracy of withholding following major changes made by the new tax law.

The updated withholding information, posted today on IRS.gov, shows the new rates for employers to use during 2018. Employers should begin using the 2018 withholding tables as soon as possible, but not later than Feb. 15, 2018. They should continue to use the 2017 withholding tables until implementing the 2018 withholding tables.

Many employees will begin to see increases in their paychecks to reflect the new law in February. The time it will take for employees to see the changes in their paychecks will vary depending on how quickly the new tables are implemented by their employers and how often they are paid — generally weekly, biweekly or monthly.   The new withholding tables are designed to work with the Forms W-4 that workers have already filed with their employers to claim withholding allowances. This will minimize burden on taxpayers and employers. Employees do not have to do anything at this time.

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2018 Tax Filing Season Begins Jan. 29, Tax Returns Due April 17; Help Available for Taxpayers

The Internal Revenue Service announced today that the nation’s tax season will begin Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 and reminded taxpayers claiming certain tax credits that refunds won’t be available before late February. 

The IRS will begin accepting tax returns on Jan. 29, with nearly 155 million individual tax returns expected to be filed in 2018. The nation’s tax deadline will be April 17 this year – so taxpayers will have two additional days to file beyond April 15.

Many software companies and tax professionals will be accepting tax returns before Jan. 29 and then will submit the returns when IRS systems open. Although the IRS will begin accepting both electronic and paper tax returns Jan. 29, paper returns will begin processing later in mid-February as system updates continue. The IRS strongly encourages people to file their tax returns electronically for faster refunds.

The IRS set the Jan. 29 opening date to ensure the security and readiness of key tax processing systems in advance of the opening and to assess the potential impact of tax legislation on 2017 tax returns.

The IRS reminds taxpayers that, by law, the IRS cannot issue refunds claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) before mid-February. While the IRS will process those returns when received, it cannot issue related refunds before mid-February. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or on debit cards starting on Feb. 27, 2018, if they chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with the tax return.

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Standard Mileage Rates for 2018 Up from Rates for 2017

WASHINGTON ― The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2018 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2018, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 54.5 cents for every mile of business travel driven, up 1 cent from the rate for 2017.
  • 18 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, up 1 cent from the rate for 2017.
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations.

The business mileage rate and the medical and moving expense rates each increased 1 cent per mile from the rates for 2017. The charitable rate is set by statute and remains unchanged.

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2017 Tax Filing Season Begins Jan. 23 for Nation’s Taxpayers, Tax Returns due April 18

IRS YouTube Video April 18 is When Your Taxes are Due in 2017 | English

WASHINGTON ― The Internal Revenue Service announced today that the nation’s tax season will begin Monday, Jan. 23, 2017 and reminded taxpayers claiming certain tax credits to expect a longer wait for refunds.

The IRS will begin accepting electronic tax returns that day, with more than 153 million individual tax returns expected to be filed in 2017. The IRS again expects more than four out of five tax returns will be prepared electronically using tax return preparation software.

Many software companies and tax professionals will be accepting tax returns before Jan. 23 and then will submit the returns when IRS systems open. The IRS will begin processing paper tax returns at the same time. There is no advantage to filing tax returns on paper in early January instead of waiting for the IRS to begin accepting e-filed returns.

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Check Your Tax Withholding this Summer to Prevent a Tax-Time Surprise

Each year, many people get a larger refund than they expect. Some find they owe a lot more tax than they thought they would. If this has happened to you, review your situation to prevent a tax surprise. Did you marry? Have a child? Change in income? Life events can have a major impact on your taxes. Bring the taxes you pay closer to the amount you owe. Here are some tips to help you come up with a plan:

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Tax Tips Small Business

  • Starting Your Own Business?

    Here are a few quick tips to help you reduce taxes

    Open a separate business checking account. Many small business owners don't realize the complications that can arise from using their personal checking account to pay for business expenses. If business expenses are mixed in with personal expenses, the IRS may disallow them.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Like Kind Exchange

    If you are disposing of property used in your business, you may want to consider a like-kind exchange to defer the taxable gain on the sale.
Friday, 23rd March 2018

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Weekly Tax Tip

Weekly tips to help you better understand tax and financial situations.
  • Tax Act Tip: The 2018 Quarterly Estimated Payment Challenge
    The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) passed in late 2017 made big changes to the tax code, including individual tax rates. Employers had to change their payroll withholding systems in February, but what should you do if you are self-employed or retired and pay your taxes on a quarterly basis?
  • Put Your Tax Refund to Good Use
    Three-fourths of filers get a refund every year, with the average check weighing in at $2,895. Here are some ideas to put that money to good use.

Tax Tips Personal

  • Are You Putting Investments in Your Child's Name?

    New rules tighten your options
     For the 2014 tax year, children, under the age of 18 who have unearned income in excess of $2,000,are taxed at their parent'shigher rate. At age 18. the kiddie tax applies unless the child provides more than 50% of his/her own support. The kiddie tax also applies to full-time studnets between the ages of 19 and 23 unless they provide more than 50% of their own support. Generally, unearned income includes interest and dividend income, capital gains, taxable social security benefits, and pension distributions.

Personal Quick Tip

  • Organized Appointment

    Go to your tax appointment well organized. Have all your income statements such as W-2s and 1099s separate from your expenses. Make sure you have all the proper social security numbers for dependents, as well as their names as they appear on their social security card. Careful organization will save you time come tax season.