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Tax Tips Small Business

  • Turning Interest Payments Into Tax Deductions

    Make interest payments work for you, not against you

    You can deduct business-related interest on your business return if you used the borrowed funds to purchase business supplies, equipment, services, etc. Co-mingling business and personal expenses makes it difficult to determine what amount of the interest is business versus personal. If this happens, the IRS may consider the entire amount as nondeductible personal interest and disallow the deduction. Therefore, keep all business purchases made with loans and credit cards clearly separate from your personal expenses. Use a separate credit card for your business to make it easier.

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Small Business Quick Tip

  • DOT Hours of Service

    Truck drivers and other employees who are subject to the Department of Transportation's "hours of service" rules are allowed to deduct 80 percent of their meals in 2016. In lieu of using actual expenses for meals and incidental expenses, you can deduct the federal rate of $63 per day.
Thursday, 17th January 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Are You Putting Investments in Your Child's Name?

    New rules tighten your options
     
     For the 2014 tax year, children, under the age of 18 who have unearned income in excess of $2,000,are taxed at their parent'shigher rate. At age 18. the kiddie tax applies unless the child provides more than 50% of his/her own support. The kiddie tax also applies to full-time studnets between the ages of 19 and 23 unless they provide more than 50% of their own support. Generally, unearned income includes interest and dividend income, capital gains, taxable social security benefits, and pension distributions.

Personal Quick Tip

  • Tuition Deduction

    If you paid qualifying tuition and related expenses in 2016, you may be able to deduct up to $4,000 of the costs or qualify for a tax credit.