If you have a question which are not in this section, please contact us.

A: No. Filing an extension only extends the time you have to file your tax return. It does not extend the time you have to pay your tax liability. There are various options available for paying your tax liability however. IRS now accepts credit cards (there is a fee) and Installment agreements (there is a fee). You should speak with a tax professional for further guidance.

A: You should file the returns you haven’t filed. You’ll pay interest and probably a penalty (unless you’ve got a really good reason). As long as you come clean voluntarily, you should avoid any truly serious trouble. By the way, there’s no statute of limitations on non-filed returns. Therefore, if you don’t file returns, interest and penalties continue to accrue.

A: Generally speaking, the following are recommended periods of retention for various documents:

7 Years

Tax Returns (uncomplicated), W-2's, 1099's, Cancelled checks supporting tax deductions, Bank deposit slips, Bank statements, Charitable contribution documentation, Credit card statements, Receipts, diaries, or logs pertaining to tax returns.

Ownership Period + 7 Years

Investment purchase and sales slips, Dividend reinvestment records, Year-end brokerage statements, Mutual fund annual statements, Investment property purchase documents, Home purchase documents, Home improvement receipts and cancelled checks, Loan paperwork.

Permanent

Tax Returns (complicated), Retirement plan annual reports, IRA annual reports, IRA nondeductible contributions (Form 8606), Divorce documents, Estate planning documents.

A: There are many advantages to having your tax return prepared professionally. Since your return will be filed electronically, you may receive any potentional refund much quicker. Also, professional tax preparers are use to working with tax returns and are familiar with many IRS procedures that you may not be. Professional tax preparers may be able to help reduce your tax liability.

A: You will need to bring all the relevant tax documents that will be needed to complete your tax return. These could include, but may not be limited to:

* W-2's * Childcare records
* 1099-B's * Medical Expense records
* 1099-DIV's * Mortgage/Closing documents
* 1099-G's * Home Improvement documents
*1099-INT's * Proof of Charitable Contributions
*1099-MISC's * Receipts for Non-Reimbursed Business Expenses
*1099-R's * Self-Employment Income/Expense records

You should also bring your previous two years tax returns so that the preparer can see how you have filed your returns in the past.

A: Fees can vary depending on the complexity of the tax return. A tax return that involves nothing more than one W-2 will be less expensive than a return that involves income from a rental property. The more work and forms that are required to complete you tax return, the more the charge will be.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Thinking of Selling Your Corporation?

    Carefully review your options before making a decision

    When it come time to sell your corporation, you have two options. You can either sell the corporation stock or have the corporation sell the assets and distribute the proceeds. The tax implications of the two sales are very different. If you choose to sell the stock, you are the seller. The corporation is not affected by the transaction. The new owner steps into your shoes as the shareholder and takes over the existing corporation. If your share of the proceeds exceeds your basis in the stock, you'll have a capital gain to report on Schedule D.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • SS Wage Base

    The Social Security wage base increases to $118,500 in 2016. This means that you are no longer required to withhold social security tax for employees after meeting this threshold. However, you are required to withhold Medicare taxes regardless of the amount of wages paid.
Thursday, 17th January 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Interest on Summer Recreation May Be Deductible

    Your motor home or boat could yield a deduction

    If you own a boat or motor home that is fully equipped with kitchen and sanitary facilities and you use it as a "second" home, the interest you pay on it is probably deductible on your tax return. Although a fishing boat without facilities won't qualify, most motor homes and campers do. If you're looking to buy a boat that doesn't qualify as a second home, you may want to consider paying for it with a home equity loan. That way, the interest is generally deductible. As with most tax rules, there are exceptions and limits so check with a tax expert before you sign on the dotted line.

Personal Quick Tip

  • Medical and Charitable Mileage

    Do you use your auto for charitable purposes? What about going to and from the doctor or dentist? Your mileage for both medical and charitable purposes may be deductible on your tax return. It is important to set up a mileage log and keep it handy so you can track your deductible mileage throuhghout the year.