If you have a question which are not in this section, please contact us.

A: No. Filing an extension only extends the time you have to file your tax return. It does not extend the time you have to pay your tax liability. There are various options available for paying your tax liability however. IRS now accepts credit cards (there is a fee) and Installment agreements (there is a fee). You should speak with a tax professional for further guidance.

A: You should file the returns you haven’t filed. You’ll pay interest and probably a penalty (unless you’ve got a really good reason). As long as you come clean voluntarily, you should avoid any truly serious trouble. By the way, there’s no statute of limitations on non-filed returns. Therefore, if you don’t file returns, interest and penalties continue to accrue.

A: Generally speaking, the following are recommended periods of retention for various documents:

7 Years

Tax Returns (uncomplicated), W-2's, 1099's, Cancelled checks supporting tax deductions, Bank deposit slips, Bank statements, Charitable contribution documentation, Credit card statements, Receipts, diaries, or logs pertaining to tax returns.

Ownership Period + 7 Years

Investment purchase and sales slips, Dividend reinvestment records, Year-end brokerage statements, Mutual fund annual statements, Investment property purchase documents, Home purchase documents, Home improvement receipts and cancelled checks, Loan paperwork.

Permanent

Tax Returns (complicated), Retirement plan annual reports, IRA annual reports, IRA nondeductible contributions (Form 8606), Divorce documents, Estate planning documents.

A: There are many advantages to having your tax return prepared professionally. Since your return will be filed electronically, you may receive any potentional refund much quicker. Also, professional tax preparers are use to working with tax returns and are familiar with many IRS procedures that you may not be. Professional tax preparers may be able to help reduce your tax liability.

A: You will need to bring all the relevant tax documents that will be needed to complete your tax return. These could include, but may not be limited to:

* W-2's * Childcare records
* 1099-B's * Medical Expense records
* 1099-DIV's * Mortgage/Closing documents
* 1099-G's * Home Improvement documents
*1099-INT's * Proof of Charitable Contributions
*1099-MISC's * Receipts for Non-Reimbursed Business Expenses
*1099-R's * Self-Employment Income/Expense records

You should also bring your previous two years tax returns so that the preparer can see how you have filed your returns in the past.

A: Fees can vary depending on the complexity of the tax return. A tax return that involves nothing more than one W-2 will be less expensive than a return that involves income from a rental property. The more work and forms that are required to complete you tax return, the more the charge will be.

Tax Tips Small Business

  • Electing to Expense the Cost of Your Business Assets

    Section 179 deduction limits increase

    The IRS allows taxpayers the option of either depreciating some assets over a specified number of years or deducting all or a portion of the cost in one year. The expense election, commonly referred to as the Section 179 deduction, is made in the year the asset is placed in service. The benefit is a large deduction in the current year that is not reduced even if the asset is placed in service late in the tax year.

    Read more ...

Small Business Quick Tip

  • Business Credit Card

    Use your credit card to buy equipment and supplies that you will need in the upcoming year. Charges on your credit card for deductible business expenses are allowed in the year you make the purchase, not in the year the charge is paid. Pay off your credit card after the beginning of the year and avoid finance charges.
Monday, 18th March 2019
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Tax Tips Personal

  • Naming a Beneficiary to Your Retirement Plan

    Nonspouse beneficiaries have new options

    If you are the beneficiary of a decedent's qualified retirement plan, and you are not the spouse of the decedent, you now have additional options for distributions. In the past, only a spouse beneficiary was permitted to roll the account into an IRA. Now, beginning in 2007,

    Read more ...

Personal Quick Tip

  • Summer Day Camp

     

    Along with the lazy, hazy days of summer come some extra expenses, including summer day camp. But, the IRS has some good news for parents: those added expenses may help you qualify for a tax credit.

    Many parents who work or are looking for work must arrange for care of their children under 13 years of age during the school vacation. The Child and Dependent Care Credit is available for expenses incurred during the summer and throughout the rest of the year.